News

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  • January 31, 2013 4:29 PM | Jessica Penrod (Administrator)
    Thanks to website member and Madre Tierra planner Stefanie Milisits for writing this blog post!

    You can find the post at this link:
    http://www.colemanconcepts.com/permaculture-in-las-vegas/#comment-12
  • December 01, 2012 10:15 PM | Jessica Penrod (Administrator)
    Permie Movie Night on Monday has been cancelled! We have not received the DVD in the mail yet. As soon as it arrives, we will reschedule. Our next event will be Saturday 12/8, a hands-on permaculture work day at the Permaculture Learning Garden. If we get 5 or more people out, we will finish up the cob bench once and for all!
    See you soon,
    Jessica

  • November 14, 2012 12:28 PM | Jessica Penrod (Administrator)

     

    Join us at Vegas Roots Community Garden this Saturday for a potluck and premiere of Somehwere in New Mexico Before the End of Time. The film follows a professor and his quest to prepare a community for a sustainable future. Topics include water harvesting and permaculture. Join us!

  • August 09, 2012 8:33 AM | Jessica Penrod (Administrator)
  • July 02, 2012 11:26 AM | Jessica Penrod (Administrator)
  • April 17, 2012 4:33 PM | Jessica Penrod (Administrator)
    Thank you to Earth Rising and The Clydesdale for playing at our 2012 Earth Day Celebration!

    http://www.lasvegassun.com/community/press-releases/348/
  • April 01, 2012 9:51 PM | Jessica Penrod (Administrator)
    Our cob bench is nearly finished! Please join us this Saturday at the garden for a muddy, foot-stomping time. Sun tea and snacks will be served!
     We have postponed the water catchment workshop until June. This will give us time to gather donations and apply for the SOUP microgrant in May. 

  • February 25, 2012 11:34 PM | Tiffany Whisenant (Administrator)

    Seattle’s vision of an urban food oasis is going forward. A seven-acre plot of land in the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood will be planted with hundreds of different kinds of edibles: walnut and chestnut trees; blueberry and raspberry bushes; fruit trees, including apples and pears; exotics like pineapple, yuzu citrus, guava, persimmons, honeyberries, and lingonberries; herbs; and more. All will be available for public plucking to anyone who wanders into the city’s first food forest.

    “This is totally innovative, and has never been done before in a public park,” Margarett Harrison, lead landscape architect for the Beacon Food Forest project, tells TakePart. Harrison is working on construction and permit drawings now and expects to break ground this summer.

    The concept of a food forest certainly pushes the envelope on urban agriculture and is grounded in the concept of permaculture, which means it will be perennial and self-sustaining, like a forest is in the wild. Not only is this forest Seattle’s first large-scale permaculture project, but it’s also believed to be the first of its kind in the nation.

    “The concept means we consider the soils, companion plants, insects, bugs, everything will be mutually beneficial to each other,” says Harrison.

    That the plan came together at all is remarkable on its own. What started as a group project for a permaculture design course ended up as a textbook example of community outreach gone right.

    Friends of the Food Forest undertook heroic outreach efforts to secure neighborhood support. The team mailed over 6,000 postcards in five different languages, tabled at events and fairs, and posted fliers,” writes Robert Mellinger for Crosscut.

    Neighborhood input was so valued by the organizers, they even used translators to help Chinese residents have a voice in the planning.

    So just who gets to harvest all that low-hanging fruit when the time comes?

    “Anyone and everyone,” says Harrison. “There was major discussion about it. People worried, ‘What if someone comes and takes all the blueberries?’ That could very well happen, but maybe someone needed those blueberries. We look at it this way; if we have none at the end of blueberry season, then it means we’re successful.”

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